Black Towns and Counties Expelled | Sincere History

 

From the 1860s to the 1920s, towns across the U.S. violently expelled African American residents.
Today, these communities remain virtually all white.
As black descendants return to demand justice, BANISHED exposes the hidden history of racial cleansing in America.
The descendants of these communities should sue the states or the federal government for the force removal of their relatives OWNED land.  

The Black Count | Thomas Alexandre Dumas

The Black Count

Thomas Alexandre Dumas fought his way to the top of the French army due to his cunning intellect, an elite swordsman and tenacity. He had the ability to drum up undying loyalty to whatever cause he supported and his charms/wit soon brought him conflict with Napoleon.

Gen. Thomas-Alexandre Dumas was one of the heroes of the French Revolution — but you won’t find a statue of him in Paris today.

He led armies of thousands in triumph through treacherous territory, from the snows of the Alps to the sands of Egypt, and his true life stories inspired his son, Alexandre Dumas, to write The Count of Monte Cristo and The Three Musketeers.

How did the son of a Haitian slave and a French nobleman become Napoleon’s leading swordsman of the Revolution, then a prisoner, and finally almost forgotten — except in the stories of a son who was not even 4 years old when his father died?

http://www.npr.org/2012/09/15/160969342/the-black-count-a-hero-on-the-field-and-the-page

Theban Legion

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Saint Maurice was the captain of the Theban Legion, a unit in the Roman army that had been recruited from Upper Egypt and consisted entirely of Christians. Although loyal to the Empire (ruled over by Maximinus Daia and Diocletian), they still remembered the words of Jesus to render to Caesar the things of Caesar, and to God the things of God. During the Bagaude, an uprising of the Gauls, Maximinus marched against them with the Theban Legion as a part of his army. The revolt was quelled, and upon their return to Aguanum (now Saint-Moritz or Saint Maurice en Valais) in Switzerland, Maximinus gave the order that the whole army should give sacrifices to the Roman gods in thanks for the success of their campaign. As part of the celebration, Maximinus ordered the execution of a number of Christian prisoners. The Theban Legion refused to comply with the order and withdrew from the rites, even going so far as to camp away from the rest of the army so as not to be drawn into what they saw as horrifyingly against their beliefs.

http://www.touregypt.net/chiste3.htm

http://www.blackpast.org/gah/st-maurice-ca-250-ca-287

Nabta Playa: Pre-dynastic Egypt

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Nabta Playa destroys conventional theories about ancient Egypt. As more archaeological work is being down, order dates of human civilizations are being discovered.

Nabta Playa is a remarkable site composed of hundreds of prehistoric tumuli, stelae, and megalithic structures located in the Nubian Desert, approximately 100 kilometers west of Abu Simbel in southern Egypt. They are the result of an advanced urban community that arose approximately 11,000 years ago, and left behind a huge assembly of stones, which have been labelled by scientists as the oldest known astronomical alignments of megaliths in the world. Some archaeologists believe that the people of Nabta Playa were the precursor civilization for the first Nile cities that arose in Egypt thousands of years later.

The Megalithic People

Settlements grew, due to large water reservoirs, and their cultures became larger and more sophisticated. One settlement, which has been excavated from this urbanisation period, contains 18 house structures arranged in two, or possibly even three, straight lines in an almost ‘Coronation Street’ style.

The area contains numerous fireplace hearths and, of course, the amazing walk-down water wells. These were the people who constructed the megaliths perhaps for ceremonial or religious purposes. The great stone alignments have been classified and named by modern archaeologists.

During this period of occupation the Nabtans erected five megalithic alignments all radiating like wheel spokes from a central cluster of stones named E-96-1 Structure A. The stones are quartzite sandstone and have been moved to the site from and open sandstone area located about half a mile away.

http://www.ancient-origins.net/ancient-places-africa/nabta-playa-and-ancient-astronomers-nubian-desert-002954

http://www.archaeologyexpert.co.uk/nabtaplayaegypt.html

http://archaeology.about.com/od/nterms/g/nabta_playa.htm

East Africa and China’s Connection

None of this comes to a surprise to me. If humans were able to migrate across the planet pre-ancient organized civilization, why would we assume otherwise after organized societies were assembled?

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Africa and China have had contact for more than a thousand years. Some scholars assert that the contacts began as early as 4th century A.D. but convincing evidence is sporadic or lacking. Beginning with the Tang dynasty (618 A.D. to 907 A.D.) documented evidence of contact and trade exists showing a relationship between China and the city-states of east Africa. This relationship has evolved over the centuries and led to a migration of Africans to China to study, trade, and act as diplomats. At least one account indicates that Du Huan was the first Chinese to visit Africa, probably in Nubia, during the 8th century A.D.

– See more at: http://www.blackpast.org/perspectives/africans-and-african-americans-china-long-history-troubled-present-and-promising-future#sthash.bFoNSgZB.dpuf

A joint team of Kenyan and Chinese archaeologists found the 15th Century Chinese coin in Mambrui – a tiny, nondescript village just north of Malindi on Kenya’s north coast.

In barely distinguishable relief, the team leader Professor Qin Dashu from Peking University’s archaeology department, read out the inscription: “Yongle Tongbao” – the name of the reign that minted the coin some time between 1403 and 1424.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-11531398

As tackled in other articles in this edition’s cover story. China is currently Africa’s largest trading partner. But actually, China has been in Africa for a long time.

In fact, in the past 10 years, scientists have been making spectacular field and archival discoveries about China’s early presence on the African continent. These latest findings were the inspiration for an international conference, “Exploring China’s Ancient Links to Africa World Conference”, which was held last October in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa.

– See more at: http://newafricanmagazine.com/chinas-long-history-africa/#sthash.WU9ybRXb.dpuf

History of the Berber People

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Angola’s Ancient Past

Out of the numerous ancient African cultures and kingdoms, Angola was one of the hardest ones to figure out their history prior to colonialism. Here are some sound sources to help people who are interested in finding out Angola’s past, prior to colonialism.

Modern Angola emerged mainly out of the territory of the former Kongo kingdom which encompassed much of the Lower Congo and northern Angola. The region, and the native Bantu kingdom, was a Portuguese colonial territory during the late nineteenth century and much of the twentieth century. Before that, it had seven hundred years of recorded or remembered history, and up to three thousand years of settlement. People speaking ancient versions of Kikongo probably arrived in the region encompassing the modern Republic of the Congo, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Angola, and Gabon from the north as part of the larger Bantu migration. They were practicing agriculture by at least 1000 BC, and working iron by at least 400 BC.

http://www.historyfiles.co.uk/KingListsAfrica/AfricaAngola.htm

The King of Angola would have been the King of the Kongo Kingdom, encompassing what is known today as northern Angola, Cabinda, the Republic of the Congo and the western portion of the Democratic republic of the Congo. The Dynasty lasted from 1400-1914 (though the record is unclear between 1718 and 1793). The ruling kings of Angola during the time of the Haitian Revolution would most likely have been Dom Henrique III Afonso Nlengi, King of Kongo (Manikongo) 1793-1802, Dom Alvaro XI Afonso Kafvasa, King of Kongo (Manikongo) 1802, and Dom Garcia V Afonso Ne Nkanga a Nvembi, King of Kongo (Manikongo) 1802-1830.

https://www.msu.edu/~williss2/carpentier/part4/kingangola.html

http://www.everyculture.com/A-Bo/Angola.html

More information on traditional culture of Angola and outside influences.

The sport of capoeria is also very popular among young people in Angola. It is said to have originated among Angolan slaves who were taken to Brazil. Here, the slaves practised this unusual combination of dance and martial arts as a way to channel aggression and express themselves.

http://www.our-africa.org/angola/people-culture

http://africanrockart.org/tara-african-rock-art-photo-gallery/angola/

The History of Major Slave Revolts; Americas and the Caribbean

The exact statistics of how many slave rebellions and revolts that took place are unknown, but historical records show there were many. American Negro Slave Revolts, by Herbert Aptheker concluded that there were at least 250 slave revolts within the United States alone prior to the year 1865, in addition to localized opposition. On record was also mutiny aboard slave ships, 155 on record; many success stories and many brutally suppressed mutinies.

According to African American Desk Reference, as early as 1522, slaves in Saint Domingue rose up in an attempt to create a African Republic; rebellious slaves destroyed the settlement of Santa Maria in Columbia.

Here are more recorded revolts.

1653 In Gloucester Virginia, a plot was betrayed by a man named Berkenhead (A White indentured servant); he was rewarded his freedom and 5,000 pounds of tobacco.

1658 Black slaves aided by Native Americans burned their masters’ homes in Hartford Connecticut.

1691 Mingoe, a Virginia slave escaped from his master; Mingoe gathered a group of followers and destroyed a number of plantations, mainly in Rappahannock County. The rebels acquired cattle, hogs and some guns. Sadly there wasn’t any documented account about their fate.

Discrimination against free blacks was more severe in Connecticut than in other New England colonies. Their lives were strongly proscribed even before they became numerous. In 1690, the colony forbade blacks and Indians to be on the streets after 9 p.m. It also forbid black “servants” to wander beyond the limits of the towns or places where they belonged without a ticket or pass from their masters or the authorities. A law of 1708, citing frequent fights between slaves and whites, imposed a minimum penalty of 30 lashes on any black who disturbed the peace or who attempted to strike a white person. Even speech was subject to control. By a 1730 law, and black, Indian, or mulatto slave “who uttered or published, about any white person, words which would be actionable if uttered by a free white was, upon conviction before any one assistant or justice of the peace, to be whipped with forty lashes.”

http://slavenorth.com/connecticut.htm

For more slave rebellions and revolts, go to Schomberg Center for research in Black culture; African American Desk Reference. 

Onesimus: Smallpox Inoculation

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Thanks to the pioneering work of Onesimus, many lives were saved from the smallpox epidemic.

Onesimus (fl. 1706 – 1717), slave and medical pioneer, was born in the late seventeenth century, probably in West Africa, although the precise date and place of his birth are unknown. He first appears in the historical record in the diary of Cotton Mather, a prominent New England theologian and minister of Boston’s Old North Church. Reverend Mather notes in a diary entry for 13 December 1706 that members of his congregation purchased for him “a very likely Slave; a young Man who is a Negro of a promising aspect of temper” (Mather, vol. 1, 579). Mather named him Onesimus, after a biblical slave who escaped from his master, an early Christian named Philemon.

http://hutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu/onesimus-fl-1706-1717-slave-and-medical-pioneer-was-born

The idea behind this radical new treatment came from Africa, specifically from a slave named Onesimus, who shared his knowledge with Cotton Mather, the town’s leading minister and his legal owner. Boston still suffered dreadfully, but thanks to Onesimus and Mather, the terror linked to smallpox began to recede after Africans rolled up their sleeves—literally—to show Boston how inoculation worked.

https://www.bostonglobe.com/ideas/2014/10/17/how-african-slave-helped-boston-fight-smallpox/XFhsMMvTGCeV62YP0XhhZI/story.html

http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/broughttolife/people/onesimus

http://www.jstor.org/stable/3491675?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

http://www.blackhistorypages.net/pages/onesimus.php

Inferiority Complex

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