Dahomey Women: Amazonian of West Africa

For the better part of 200 years, thousands of female soldiers fought and died to expand the borders of their West African kingdom. Even their conquerors, the French, acknowledged their “prodigious bravery.”

As Father Borghero fans himself, 3,000 heavily armed soldiers march into the square and begin a mock assault on a series of defenses designed to represent an enemy capital. The Dahomean troops are a fearsome sight, barefoot and bristling with clubs and knives. A few, known as Reapers, are armed with gleaming three-foot-long straight razors, each wielded two-handed and capable, the priest is told, of slicing a man clean in two.

The soldiers advance in silence, reconnoitering. Their first obstacle is a wall—huge piles of acacia branches bristling with needle-sharp thorns, forming a barricade that stretches nearly 440 yards. The troops rush it furiously, ignoring the wounds that the two-inch-long thorns inflict. After scrambling to the top, they mime hand-to-hand combat with imaginary defenders, fall back, scale the thorn wall a second time, then storm a group of huts and drag a group of cringing “prisoners” to where Glele stands, assessing their performance. The bravest are presented with belts made from acacia thorns. Proud to show themselves impervious to pain, the warriors strap their trophies around their waists.

The general who led the assault appears and gives a lengthy speech, comparing the valor of Dahomey’s warrior elite to that of European troops and suggesting that such equally brave peoples should never be enemies. Borghero listens, but his mind is wandering. He finds the general captivating: “slender but shapely, proud of bearing, but without affectation.” Not too tall, perhaps, nor excessively muscular. But then, of course, the general is a woman, as are all 3,000 of her troops. Father Borghero has been watching the King of Dahomey’s famed corps of “amazons,” as contemporary writers termed them—the only female soldiers in the world who then routinely served as combat troops.

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/dahomeys-women-warriors-88286072/#8MQTUpWzJhYapIY0.99
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Music: “Legacy (feat. Braille)” by Golden Disciples

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4 Comments

  1. Simply love it! Thank you for writing about it, and thanks for the account of Father Borghero about the great amazons of Dahomey. I too, started talking about them, when I wrote about Behanzin, and translated his farewell speech.
    http://afrolegends.com/2012/05/14/sans-parole-sans-honneur-la-loi-du-materialisme-behanzin-one-of-the-last-african-resistant-to-colonization/
    http://afrolegends.com/2012/05/18/behanzins-farewell-speech-in-dahomey/

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  2. Thank you for this knowledge. I’ve heard stories of Black Amazons but, its good to know where they were from in Africa and a great deal more about them. Now I know how to use their story as reference in the SoveReign Comics Verse.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    • Latti Ice

       /  March 17, 2015

      🙂 You are welcome and thank you for the comment. It is much appreciated.

      Like

      Reply

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